Metrodora: Ancient Greek Physician and Rebel

Metrodora was an ancient Greek physician, possibly of Egyptian origin, that practiced medicine and wrote the oldest known medical text by a woman named “On the Diseases and Cures of Women”. She lived sometime between 200-400 CE and her focus lied in female medicine, not so surprising perhaps, since in ancient Greece women and slaves were not allowed to practice medicine as it was considered a science gifted by the gods. Midwifes however, were common and women did assist with childbirth and some aspects of gynecology. Metrodora was unique in that she covered all areas of medicine related to women in her texts and practices, and she did this in a time when this wasn’t really allowed.

Continue reading “Metrodora: Ancient Greek Physician and Rebel”

Mental Health Apps: Meditation & Relaxation

In part 2 I cover one of my favourite subjects, meditation apps. Meditation has been proven to help relieve anxiety and stress, and I’m personally a sucker for guided meditations. I have a hard time turning my brain off so listening to someone else guide me is so far the best option for me. I try to meditate at least once a day and I find that it really makes a difference for my well-being. Here I bring up 7 meditation and relaxation apps that might make a difference in your life!

Continue reading “Mental Health Apps: Meditation & Relaxation”

Émilie du Châtelet; one of the first female scientists

Emilie Du Chatelet

A French mathematician, physicist and writer often credited to be one of the first female scientists, Èmilie was born 17 December 1706 in Paris to a father of lesser nobility. She grew up around learned men and her father, who had the position of the Principal Secretary and Introducer of Ambassadors to King Louis XIV, held a weekly salon where many well-respected writers and scientists were invited. During her life Émilie was a famous and respected figure in France. Her works were published in several countries and translated to German and Italian; her ideas discussed in the most important journals of the era, such as the Encyclopédie of Diderot and D’Alembert. She was active from the 1730s until her early death in 1749.

Unfortunately, she is most known for being Voltaire’s mistress. But she was a great scientist and thinker in her own right; which is one of the many reasons why I wanted to write something about her. I hope I made her justice.

Continue reading “Émilie du Châtelet; one of the first female scientists”

FutureFunded: crowfunding platform to help women

FutureFunded - logo - crowfunding

As you can see on the official website of this project, FutureFunded is a crowfunding platform created by women and for women. The initial idea of its two founders is to help women to be trained in technology. In this way they give power to a disadvantaged group even in certain areas such as technology, where there are still more male faces than female faces.

In order to help women in fields such as science, technology, engineering and mathematics or STEM (Science Technology Engineering Mathematics), Cecilia Tham (CEO) and co-founder with Laura Fernández, will allow the financing of projects collectively through of its FutureFunded platform, that is, by the so fashionable  crowfunding.

Continue reading “FutureFunded: crowfunding platform to help women”

Ninni Kronberg conquers the powdered milk world

Yes, I know, another Swedish inventor, but hey, I’m Swedish and I want to toot our own horn sometimes. We are pretty bad at that but I generally have no trouble doing so, so why not. I know it’s not very jantelag1 of me but I don’t really care.

This week I want to introduce you to a woman whose patent laid the foundation for the company Semper AB. Maria Johanna (Ninni) Kronberg (1874- 1949) was a Swedish inventor and self-taught physiologist in nutrition born in Gävle. Her education was mostly handled by guvernants and she never got a studentexamen (a university entrance examination that doesn’t exist today). At age 22 she married a wholesale merchant and 1919 the pair discovered a new way to make yeast that they patented. Ninni’s husband was also a partner in a local malt house and she was active in the business together with her husband. The business, and the marriage, failed and they separated 1922 (the divorce was finalized 1925). After the divorce Ninni moved to a friend whose husband was consul Wilhem Westrup on Rydsgårds gods (Rydsgård manor) in Skåne, and it was there that her career really took off.

Continue reading “Ninni Kronberg conquers the powdered milk world”

Radium Girls: victims to whom we owe a lot …

Radium girls

The intoxication by radium of a group of women in 1917 in Orange, New Jersey, titled this story. This is the story of Radium Girls. Not many people know it and they should because we owe them a lot. That is the reason for publishing this new post with the story of these American girls who changed the world of work forever. They did not do it at a low price precisely.

This is a dramatic story that finally led to the current occupational risk prevention system after numerous struggles against the American justice and medical society of the time. With human sacrifices too. All of that started in the middle of World War I when thousands of employees went to work in the luminescent watches factories. Watches that the soldiers in the front needed to see the time even in the dark nights …

Continue reading “Radium Girls: victims to whom we owe a lot …”

Elisabeth Christina von Linné’s spark

Tropaeolum majus

For some time, I have had this idea of giving more spotlight to the women science might have forgotten, to show young girls out there that science has always been a place where women have been. Maybe not as frequently as men, it wasn’t generally accepted after all, but they’re there if you look. Some women made a mark on history even if society were against them. Maybe they were wives or daughters of scientists and learned men, maybe they just stood their ground, insisting to do what they loved despite the resistance.

I found it hard to decide what brilliant mind I was going to start with, but after some research I found, to my joyful surprise, that my idol Carl Linnaeus own daughter had made a mark in history. Small, maybe not that relevant at all, but I couldn’t help but instantly love her. As a biologist, carrying a name after Linnaeus himself, I felt it was my duty to introduce Elisabeth Christina von Linné to anyone that would care enough to notice her. Continue reading “Elisabeth Christina von Linné’s spark”

In memory of Ángela Ruiz Robles: precursor of the ebook

We will dedicate this first article to a Spanish woman who doesn’t deserve to be forgotten, Ángela Ruiz Robles, and her most outstanding work: the mechanical encyclopedia. Many people today use an eBook, but very few know their Spanish predecessor. Then, the target is that you know her history. Come On!

Ángela was born on March 28, 1895 in Villamanín, province of León (Spain). There she would enter the School of Teacher Training of León to become a teacher and director at the Gordón School during 1917, and a year later she would get a place at a school in Mandia, a small village near Ferrol. During her trajectory she obtained several distinctions and awards for his merits in the different schools he went through. And those merits aren’t only limited to having gone to studies in a chovinist era and where women were destined to shape their future as housewives, but because she came to give lectures and writo important books, up to 16 scientific works between 1938 and 1946 and it is worth highlighting the 1944 Grammatical Scientific Atlas. Continue reading “In memory of Ángela Ruiz Robles: precursor of the ebook”